Family Gatherings, Graduation Parties, and Graduation Plans

By: Sean Scott

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This past Sunday we acknowledged quite a few graduating seniors at Redeemer. That means a lot of graduation plans, finding tickets for family, planning parties, and not to mention, remembering to not trip on stage as they receive their diploma. It is also a big time of transition for parents. I can only imagine what it must be like for our seniors’ parents seeing their child standing tall on graduation day while simultaneously having the images of their baby in their arms for the first time after they were born.

 

I am a brand new parent, and maybe that’s why I have paid such close attention to our families as they have approached and are navigating through this season of change. It’s hard not to dream and imagine what our daughter will be like, what she would have accomplished by the time she graduated high school. I have prayed for our families with graduates, that they would hold on to the promises of God that he has them in their hands, that his plans for their lives are far better than anything they could have come up with themselves.

 

As I was doing some reading on the subject, I stumbled across an article from Melissa Kruger on The Gospel Coalition. I had to stop reading after the first paragraph my first time around, unable to make out the computer screen through tears. But I came back to the article because I realized Kruger wasn’t simply attempting to make the reader cry. She has processed her feelings and opened herself up in vulnerability to write about this stage of life. The article is titled “Graduation: Grief and Gratitude,” and she captures her experience in a succinct yet helpful way.

 

Even if you are not a parent, your children are too young to say the word diploma, or have grandkids, give this article a read. There is good wisdom about not only philosophy of parenting, but how to process bittersweet transitions in life. I feel encouraged having read this article, that the Lord uses such transitional periods to bring himself glory because often, we find ourselves with no options but to run to him for comfort in the face of our grief, as well as overflow with joy as we express our gratitude for the ways he has shaped and molded these precious children.

 

Here is just a sample of Kruger’s words:

 

“I haven’t just lost my cuddly baby with chunky thighs and infectious laughter. I’ve gained a daughter taller than myself with a heart for Jesus that overflows to every person she meets. While we used to look at her in wonderment of what she’d become, we now look at her in amazement of who she is—which happens to be a much kinder person in every way than either of her parents. We fully recognize that what her genetic code didn’t offer her, the Spirit produced in beautiful ways.”

Read the rest of the article here